Brad Williams

Brad Williams

A native of Prairie du Chien, Brad graduated from U-W-La Crosse and has worked in radio news for more than 30 years, mostly in the La Crosse area.  Brad writes the website "Triviazoids," which finds odd connections between events that happen on a certain date, and he writes and performs with the local comedy group Heart of La Crosse.  He's been featured on several national TV programs because of his memory skills.  

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Local study says arts, culture bring in $32 million a year and 1,100 jobs.

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Friday - June 30, 2017 4:27 pm

Flag raised above Riverfest

Flag ceremony officially starts 35th Riverfest

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In June of 1990, the TV show 'WWF Superstars of Wrestling' featured bouts from the La Crosse Center three weeks in a row.  On one episode, Brutus Beefcake defeated Jim Ruby, and Nikolai Volkoff beat Boris Zhukov.
 
The top man in the Soviet Union visited the Midwest that June.  Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and his wife spent an afternoon in the Twin Cities, at the invitation of Minnesota Governor Rudy Perpich.  The Bush White House slammed Democrat Perpich for not saving spaces for Minnesota's two U.S. Senators, Republicans Dave Durenberger and Rudy Boschwitz, at a luncheon for Gorbachev.  The governor said he had never agreed to invite the senators. 
 
La Crosse's new airport terminal was trying to draw local customers to its bar, called Amelia's, by presenting live bands on the weekends.  Meanwhile, on TV, Jerry Seinfeld was trying out a new sitcom on NBC, about his life as a comedian.  The show about Jerry and his friends George, Elaine, and Kramer, became a big hit and lasted eight years...but even at the beginning of the series, Seinfeld promised that he wasn't going to do another sitcom after this one.  Not that there was anything wrong with that...in 1990, yesterday in La Crosse.
 

Data could be used to promote arts for legislation or business groups.

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State gave out $1 million to 57 counties for security.

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In 1972, the 4th of July fell on a Tuesday, and the La Crosse Tribune suggested that Independence Day become a Monday holiday, for the sake of convenience.  Just one year before, the U.S. had started celebrating Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Presidents' Day on Mondays instead of on their traditional dates.  La Crosse was preparing for an "Old Fashion 4th of July" celebration at the festgrounds for the long holiday weekend.  Riverfest wouldn't come along for another decade yet. 
 
The Midwest was catching lottery fever.  Illinois and Michigan were competing to become the first Midwestern state to offer lottery games.  One Illinois legislator, Zeke Giorgi of Rockford, said bingo had been approved by his state the year before, and people were becoming more liberal about gambling.  Wisconsin was still against it, though, with one Justice Department spokesman arguing that the biggest winner from a lottery would be organized crime.
 
On Thursday nights in the summer of '72, TV watchers could see Dean Martin, "Ironside," the final season of "My Three Sons," and reruns of "My World, and Welcome to It," a comedy based on the cartoons and writings of James Thurber.  On Channel 19 in La Crosse, you could watch Dick Cavett's talk show at 10:30, and stay tuned at midnight to cook with the "Galloping Gourmet."  Forty-five years ago, Yesterday in La Crosse.
 

One of city's drop boxes appeared to be smashed

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Wednesday - June 28, 2017 8:32 am

Checking on the cops, 33 years ago

The CB radio fad may have been done by 1984, but special radios were still popular...especially police scanners, for people to listen to squad-car radios.  Wettstein's in La Crosse was selling a Bearcat scanner for $99.

If you wanted a good car radio with a cassette player, you could buy a Clarion model for about $200 at Schaak Electronics in Valley View Mall. 

Talk radio was becoming popular in 1984.  Listeners to WIZM could hear Talknet at night, to get financial advice from Bruce Williams or information about personal affairs from Sally Jessy Raphael.  Both hosts later came to La Crosse for public appearances.  And Larry King was on late at night.  He hadn't started his TV show on CNN yet.

In '84, NASA was beginning to take applications for civilian astronauts.  The official job title was "space flight participant."  The first civilian on a space shuttle crew was teacher Christa McAuliffe, whose died in the Challenger disaster in 1986.  We wouldn't get a teacher leading lessons in orbit until more than 20 years later.  NASA was searching for civilians 33 years ago, yesterday in La Crosse.

 

 

Onalaska Assemblyman Steve Doyle isn't on board.

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Funding for Changing the Culture coalition ended

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