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LGBTQ center leader says stakes are high in Supreme Court wedding cake case Featured

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FILE - In this March 10, 2014 file photo, Masterpiece Cakeshop owner Jack Phillips cracks eggs into a cake batter mixer inside his store in Lakewood, Colo. The Supreme Court is taking on a new clash between gay rights and religion in a case about a wedding cake for a same-sex couple in Colorado. The justices said Monday, June 26, 2017, they will consider whether a baker who objects to same-sex marriage on religious grounds can refuse to make a wedding cake for a gay couple. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File) FILE - In this March 10, 2014 file photo, Masterpiece Cakeshop owner Jack Phillips cracks eggs into a cake batter mixer inside his store in Lakewood, Colo. The Supreme Court is taking on a new clash between gay rights and religion in a case about a wedding cake for a same-sex couple in Colorado. The justices said Monday, June 26, 2017, they will consider whether a baker who objects to same-sex marriage on religious grounds can refuse to make a wedding cake for a gay couple. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

Huge stakes in the wedding cake case heard at the U.S. Supreme court this week.

The case in front of justices Tuesday relates to the Colorado baker who refused to make a cake for two men looking to get married.

Jessica Polacek, from 7 Rivers LGBTQ Connection in La Crosse, says this discrimination case seems all to familiar.

"This isn't anything we haven't gone through before," she told WIZM. "We saw this in the 40s, 50s and 60s.

"When in the deep south you would see signs hung up, 'No colored,' or 'Colored entrance' because they felt black people were sub-human."

The dispute in his refusal to make a cake is that he violated Colorado's discrimination laws. It's something that simply has to be upheld, Polacek said.

"It's like a row of dominos," she said. "If this one state is found to be out of place with this protection they have for LGBT people, what next?

"When you start pampering with the idea that certain businesses don't have to cater to a certain group of people, well, that's discrimination."

And, for the court to say otherwise would create a dangerous precedent, she believes.

"If it's LGBT people today, who's next?" Polacek continued. "Muslims, Native Americans, African Americans?"

A decision in the wedding cake case should come from the Supreme Court in June.

Last modified on Wednesday - December 6, 2017 2:10 am
Mitch Reynolds

Mitch Reynolds is the News Director at Midwest Family Broadcasting. He covers the internecine agonies of La Crosse city hall. He really likes basketball.

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