As I See It

As I See It (329)

Wisconsin's longest running daily commentary, a daily tradition since 1971.

Monday - October 24, 2016 9:03 am

Our elections are not rigged

Written by

The election is rigged. That is the claim from one of our presidential candidates. It is not true, of course, but that isn't stopping some from believing it. The fact is, there is integrity to our elections. In Wisconsin, a number of steps are taken to ensure that the outcome of the elections is determined solely by the voters. Some of those steps are obvious. People must prove their identity when they register to vote, and must now show a photo ID at the polls. But much of the work is done behind the scenes. A statewide voter database updated in real time ensures people are only registered once, and aren't convicted felons prohibited from voting.The voting machines are tested, publicly, before each election. On election day, the results, tabulated by voting machines, are kept in a vault, a priority for local clerks throughout the state. And even after the votes are tallied, every local clerk in Wisconsin canvasses the vote, doublechecking to ensure all the numbers add up. If there are rare instances of some sort of fraud, typically accidents, those who somehow vote twice can be prosecuted by our courts. The United States election system is not rigged. To say that it is is an insult to those who work so hard to ensure the integrity of our elections. They deserve our thanks, not our criticism.

Comment

Tuesday - October 18, 2016 8:58 am

Will final debate focus on real issues?

Written by

It has come down to this. The final presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton happens tomorrow night. It marks the final chance for the two candidates to share a stage together, and the final chance for the two presidential hopefuls to tell us where they stand on the issues. Unfortunately, the first two debates were mired by finger-pointing and name calling, with very little discussion of actual policy. We have heard little on the candidate's stand on tax policy, or foreign policy or other issues they would be charged with dealing with as President. Instead we have heard discussions of sexual abuse, adultery and whether one of them should be in jail. The American people deserve better. One issue that should be the subject of debate is transparency. Neither candidate has offered their views of how transparent their administration should or would be. There are few issues as important to so many people. Transparency is key to our democracy, allowing citizens to hold our representatives accountable. But neither presidential candidate has even addressed the topic.They dodge it at every turn, from refusing to share emails or release their tax returns. In fact, we have found out more about how they really operate from the likes of Wikileaks and TMZ. We deserve to know whether they pledge to run an open government. But if past history is any guide, we won't even hear the topic discussed at the final presidential debate.

Comment

Monday - October 17, 2016 10:21 am

No excuse for not voting

Written by

The time to exercise your right has now begun. Starting today, early voting for the November 8 election begins in La Crosse County. That gives us three weeks to cast a ballot at our convenience. And it gives us little excuse for not bothering to cast a ballot. You don't need a reason to vote early, or by absentee. Any Wisconsin voter who wants to vote early at their local clerk's office, or by mail, has the right to do so. We have seen in recent elections the increased popularity of early voting. It makes it more convenient, especially if there is a chance we won't be able to make it to the polls on November 8th. But voting early to avoid long lines at the polls doesn't guarantee you won't still have to stand in line. It is not uncommon for people to have to line up to vote early. You will still have to show a photo ID when voting early. And if you choose to vote absentee, you will need to ensure the witness fills in their address, or it will be thrown out under a new state law. If you aren't sure where you vote, or have any questions about the election process, this is a good time to contact your local clerk, who will be happy to help. So if it is more convenient for you, feel free to vote today. It is your right, and it should be exercised.

Comment

Friday - October 14, 2016 9:03 am

La Crosse should budget only for what city needs

Written by

The city of La Crosse has done a good job holding the line on property taxes in recent years. The levy rate has held basically steady for several years, meaning that for most people their property taxes have not gone up. In fact, the city's share of property taxes has held steady for five years. Again this year, Mayor Tim Kabat put forth a budget which would continue to fund essential city services, and do so without raising taxes. That is what we should want in a budget. But others think the city should spend more, even when it doesn't need to spend more. That was the vote of the La Crosse Board of Estimates which voted to add $250,000 in spending, for no reason. Just to have it in case they need it. Some wanted to add nearly twice that much in spending. And tuck it away in reserves. Because we might need it some day. The Mayor's budget does what a budget is supposed to do. Identify spending priorities, and fund those which are most important to the community. Not spend, or tuck away, or more importantly, take from us, what they don't need.

Comment

Wednesday - October 12, 2016 9:04 am

Pot calls kettle black

Written by

Pot, meet kettle. Wisconsin's largest business lobbying group is criticizing one politician for advocating the very same stance as they have. Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce has for the past few years argued in favor of a gas tax increase as a way to raise money to pay to build and repair roads in the state. That is not a radical idea. A number of politicians have advocated a three cent gas tax increase to raise road money. It seems a more prudent approach than continually borrowing money to pay for road work, passing the costs along to future generations. But WMC, despite its pledged support for a higher gas tax, took one state senate candidate, Mark Harris of Fond du Lac, to task for proposing a higher gas tax. It is running an ad criticizing Harris for the idea of raising the gas tax, and even urges people to call the candidate to tell him his liberal tax policies are hurting Wisconsin families. Why is WMC critical of Harris for proposing the same policies it espouses? WMC isn't saying. But the inference clearly is that the group, which consistently supports republican candidates, is against Harris' idea simply because he is a democrat. It is unfortunate that this powerful group is more interested in electing republicans than it is in truly solving the issue.

Comment

Tuesday - October 11, 2016 9:00 am

More choices needed at ballot box

Written by

Election day is now less than a month away, but once again voters in Wisconsin will find themselves with few choices when they head to the polls. In fact, in many cases, they will have just one choice...the incumbent. All 99 Wisconsin Assembly seats are up for election in November. But 17 of those seats are held by incumbents who don't have a single opponent. In the Wisconsin Senate, only half of the 16 seats up for election have an opponent to the incumbent to give voters more than once choice. That is deplorable for our democracy, but it is no accident. Lawmakers who currently hold office in Madison worked hard to make sure that they can coast to re-election. The political boundaries, created by Wisconsin's legislative Republicans in 2011, were fixed to make them safe for republican office holders. They drew the boundaries to stack each district with as many like-minded voters as they could to ensure their candidates won re-election. That is pretty easy when voters have no choice on election day. The next Wisconsin Legislature should come up with legislative districts which allow more candidates to have a fair shot at winning, giving voters a real choice in the ballot box. Because otherwise, what is the point of even having an election?

Comment

Just what will it take? U.S. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and U.S. Senator Ron Johnson have been ambivalent supporters of Donald Trump's candidacy for President. Ryan hesitated at offering his support initially, but eventually relented. Johnson too pledged loyalty to Trump, but said he could withdraw that support if Trump crossed the line. Apparently objectifying women doesn't cross the line in their minds. Nor does being a racist, or a birther. Both Ryan and Johnson have condemned Trump's latest words and actions, but continue to offer their support for his candidacy. It has turned into quite a Texas two-step. Ryan, along with Johnson, and Governor Scott Walker were to appear with Trump together for the first time in a supposed show of unity in Wisconsin over the weekend. After the revelation of Trump's sexist and mysoginist comments, Trump was uninvited. So much for party unity. The rally went on, but without Trump, and with only three mentions of the candidate by name. It's like they are pretending Trump doesn't exist. But he does, at the top of the ticket, and Wisconsin's top politicians continue to support the indefensible.

Comment

Friday - October 7, 2016 9:04 am

Looking for alternatives to jail worthy of study

Written by

We spend a lot of money to lock people up. But are there more efficient, and effective, ways to deal with lawbreakers? That is a question that a newly appointed committee in Wisconsin will try to answer. And a La Crosse judge will be among those working on the issue. Judge Elliot Levine is among those serving on the statewide panel, and he should have a lot to offer. Levine points to the failed war on drugs as proof that locking up drug users hasn't solved the nation's drug problem, despite the billions of dollars spent on the effort. Just look at who is sitting behind bars in La Crosse's jail. Many of them are frequent fliers, no stranger to the justice system, who keep getting in trouble again after they get out of jail. La Crosse county has been innovative in trying to come up with jail alternatives which may help reduce recidivism, and save taxpayers money. We have established a special drug court to try to help people stay out of jail and beat their addictions. We have a special OWI court, and a special Veterans court which focuses on military veterans who have run afoul of the law. La Crosse has been among the first in the state to establish these special courts. This group will spend a couple years studying and identifying solutions in hopes of creating new laws. IF they can come up with better ways to deal with lawbreakers that can help them get on the straight and narrow, and save us tax money, we're all ears.

Comment

Thursday - October 6, 2016 9:33 am

School spending up, but not enough

Written by

We have heard plenty of stories about Wisconsin schools having to deal with reduced funding by the state. Turns out it isn't exactly true. The non-partisan Legislative Fiscal Bureau this week released a report finding that state funding for public schools has actually gone up slightly in the past few years. The report finds that state support for schools last year covered 62.7% of the cost of educating our children. That is up slightly from 62.3% in 2014, and 62% in 2013. But the state should do more. Wisconsin used to promise school districts the state would cover two-thirds of the cost of education, but that went out the window during tight budget times a dozen years ago. In the years since, we have seen a marked increase in the number of Wisconsin school districts turning to voters in the form of a referendum seeking permission to exceed state imposed levy limits. That means higher property taxes to pay for what the state will not. Yet those referendums have been overwhelmingly approved, signaling voters value education, and believe paying for it is a good use of their tax money. The state should further increase its commitment to funding public education, and they could do that without raising an additional dollar in tax revenue. If Wisconsin abandoned the voucher system, paying for students to attend private schools at taxpayer expense, we could once again fund at least two-thirds of the cost. That would be money well spent.

Comment

Wednesday - October 5, 2016 9:01 am

Close loopholes in ignition interlock law

Written by

Wisconsin continues to have some of the most lax drunk driving laws in the nation. It is probably no coincidence that Wisconsin also has the highest rate of drunk driving in the nation. Lawmakers in Madison have repeatedly failed to get tough on drunk drivers. But one lawmaker wants to change that. Rep. Andre Jacque of De Pere wants to toughen the laws requiring certain drunk drivers to have an ignition interlock device installed on their car. Wisconsin law requires certain drunk drivers, those who are repeat offenders or who have a blood alcohol level above 0.15 are required to have the device installed which prevents them from starting their car if they have been drinking. But it seems there are plenty of loopholes. It seems many of those who are ordered by the court to have the devices installed aren't doing so, because failing to do so carries no criminal penalty. A violation is the equivalent of a traffic ticket. Others are circumventing court orders by driving someone else's car, or even switching the title to a family member or friend. Jacque's legislation would strengthen penalties by tying the interlock system to a person's driver's license instead of their car title, and by significantly increasing fines for ignoring the court order. This is a small step Wisconsin lawmakers can take to keep us safe on the roads.

Comment