As I See It

As I See It (329)

Wisconsin's longest running daily commentary, a daily tradition since 1971.

Monday - December 19, 2016 9:41 am

No more twists in this final chapter

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What next in this crazy election season? We have witnessed the unpredictable election of a man many considered unelectable to the office of President of the United States. We have witnessed a pointless recount, but also allegations of Russian hacking. Today, the final chapter in this election will be written. The 538 members of the Electoral College will cast their ballots today to make the outcome of this election official. But some suggest the story isn't over. At least one Republican elector vows not to vote for Trump, the candidate to whom he is pledged. Many of these electors, never before in the spotlight, have been called out by name and inundated with phone calls and emails urging them not to vote for Donald Trump. It would take 36 members of the Electoral College switching away from Trump for this effort to work. It won't work, and it would be futile to even try. Even if the electors prevented Trump from assuming the office of the Presisdency, that would simply leave it up to Congress to decide. There is no doubt what the Republican controlled Congress would do. Despite all the twists and turns of this presidential election, it seems this roller coaster ride is finally over.

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Friday - December 16, 2016 8:59 am

Gov Walker, fundraiser-in-chief

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Tis the season of giving. Unless you are Governor Scott Walker, for whom the season of taking continues. Our fundraiser-in-chief held another fancy fundraiser for himself last night. It was at the posh Pfister Hotel in Milwaukee, where the wealthy and elite eagerly plunked down as much as $5000 per person to dine with Walker. So-called “general guests” could spend just $250 each to enjoy some holiday cheer with the Governor. Of course, such holiday cheer is nothing new for Walker. Last year, he offered people the chance to ice skate with the Governor for $20, or a chance to dance and drink with Walker at his inaugural ball. He even once, in a fundraising letter to donors, suggested that putting money in his campaign coffers would be money better spent than buying gifts for their children. And he once even offered up the chance to pray with the Governor for the bargain price of just $25. The problem is that Walker is in the midst of putting together the next state budget. No doubt this holiday season, those who give money to the Governor will find themselves on his nice list, while the rest of us can expect another lump of coal in our stockings.

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Tuesday - December 13, 2016 9:03 am

More oversight, rules, needed at WEDC

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Wisconsin's chief job creation agency is back in the news, and once again the news is not good. It turns out that the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation continues to hand out our tax dollars to companies that then ship jobs overseas. But at a board meeting today, WEDC will be asked to adopt stricter reporting requirements. Two years ago, WEDC insisted that any companies which get state tax dollars to create jobs, but then ship those jobs overseas, would have to notify the state within 30 days. But it turns out that policy is only being applied to new contracts. Since the policy was enacted, the Eaten Corp accepted more than $37,000 from the state, but then outsourced hundreds of jobs to Mexico. Some companies allegedly received past awards, outsourced the jobs, then received new contracts from the state. Apparently, the WEDC board likes giving our money away, even with little in return. Critics hope to force WEDC to notify the state of job cuts or outsourced jobs no matter when they received the contract. The new policy would also require the agency to tell its board about companies that cut jobs, and those companies which fail to notify the state when they do. These new policies are needed because we can't afford to allow the state to keep playing Santa Claus with our tax dollars.

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Monday - December 12, 2016 9:37 am

Funding Wisconsin parks should be a priority

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A budget is a matter of establishing priorities. Determining how to best spend money for the best results. But that doesn't seem to be the case for our lawmakers in Madison. In the 2015 budget, they pulled all state funding for all of Wisconsin's state parks, leaving them to survive only on fees. Not surprisingly, the cost of visiting those parks went up sharply. Admission fees went up by as much as $11 a day. But Wisconsin's parks are still struggling, with an estimated budget deficit of $1.4 million. So the DNR wants to raise fees even more. Significantly. If approved, the cost of visiting some of Wisconsin's most popular state parks would go up by an additional $10. And the DNR wants to be able to sell naming rights at our state parks as a way to generate additional revenue. We don't need to slap corporate names on our pristine parks. Those parks are one reason Wisconsin gets so many summer visitors. Make it too pricey, and those numbers are sure to drop. But more importantly, properly funding our parks should be a priority of our lawmakers who should invest in one of the things that make Wisconsin a great place to live and visit.

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Friday - December 9, 2016 9:44 am

Do democrats even need to show up in Madison?

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This is what is wrong in Madison. Our lawmakers aren't really interested in hearing good ideas, unless they come from members of their own party. They continue to march in lockstep, following the orders of their party bosses who tell them what to think and how to vote. And sometimes the other team would rather just take their ball and go home. That seems to be the case now with comments from State Senate Minority Leader Jennifer Shilling of La Crosse. When asked about a democratic plan for solving the state's transportation budget crisis, Shilling punted, saying it is not her party's responsibility to come up with a plan for fixing and paying for our roads. She admits the state needs a long-term, sustainable plan for paying for our roads, but thinks only republicans should be responsible for coming up with that plan. To be fair, republicans control the legislature, and likely would refuse to even allow a vote on any democratic solution. But if we are going to follow that logic, then democrats can just coast for the next two years. Why not just take the next two years off then? Our political parties need to work together, each coming up with ideas, and then debating those ideas fairly for the benefit of all Wisconsinites, regardless of which party is in control in Madison.

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Your turn. Those who promise a quick end to Obamacare have worked hard to kill it, but not so hard to fix it. Critics have shouted end Obamacare, and it is widely assumed that Republicans who control Congress will make ending the Affordable Care Act their top priority in the coming term. But then what? U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan is already backpedaling on the repeal Obamacare pledge. Ryan suggests Congress may vote to end Obamacare, but delay the date of its demise. Why? Because coming up with a workable health care plan that people can afford and is sustainable is hard. Ryan says so himself, pointing out it took six years to create and adopt the Affordable Care Act, so there won't be a replacement plan available, in his words, next football season. But Ryan and the rest of his party who were so critical of the legislation, and made killing it their top priority, still don't have a plan for something better. They had six years, just like Obama, to develop a plan. They didn't. If only those who worked so tirelessly to kill Obamacare had instead spent their time coming up with a better plan, we could pass that ideal health care legislation tomorrow. But we're still waiting for those who so eagerly tell us what they don't like to provide a plan they do like.

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It was one year ago this week when state investigators raided Wisconsin's troubled youth prison. The list of allegations is lengthy, and troubling. Sexual assault. Child neglect. Tampering with public documents. Intimidation of victims. Use of pepper spray to cause bodily harm. That raid followed a nearly year long investigation, and was two years after the complaints first came in. Since that raid on the Lincoln Hill School for Boys, several staff members have left, and nearly every Department of Corrections employee who oversaw the facility, including the state's Secretary of Corrections has quit or moved on. But what we don't have yet is the truth. The federal government took over the investigation shortly after the raid, and so far not a single person has been charged. The FBI will only say its investigation is ongoing. We don't even know the status of the investigation. With no resolution, it is difficult to know what changes to make at Lincoln Hills. Now, some are calling for the construction of a new juvenile lockup, in Milwaukee, which state taxpayers may be asked to pay for. Before we start throwing more money at the problem, shouldn't we wait to see exactly what the problem is and what should be done about it?

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Friday - December 2, 2016 8:58 am

Ron Kind silent about party's future

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Ron Kind is being a bit coy. The La Crosse Congressman would prefer to keep certain things confidential. Like how he voted in the election of House Minority Leader. Kind refuses to say how he voted in the contest between Nancy Pelosi and her challenger, Ohio Congressman Tim Ryan. Pelosi won that secret-ballot vote, and the right to remain Minority Leader. But it was hardly a shoe-in. Ryan captured 63 votes to Pelosi's 134. Those who voted for change reminded fellow democrats that their party got creamed in the last election, from the top of the ticket on down. But Kind won't say how he voted. A spokeswoman says that's because “this is exactly the type of inside-Washington politics that Wisconsinites are sick of hearing about.” Really? Why the secrecy? Explaining who he wants to lead his party in Washington is somehow inside Washington? People deserve to know how Kind voted. Does he want to see the party move more to the center or stay far left? Kind won't say. He is not bound to, given that this election was on a secret ballot. But keeping things secret seems much more like the kind of Washington politics that Wisconsinites are really sick of than simply telling us who he thinks should hold his party's most powerful position.

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Thursday - December 1, 2016 8:59 am

Many benefits to UWL

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We probably don't think about it much. Just what is the benefit of having a University of Wisconsin campus in La Crosse? A public forum in La Crosse featuring University System President Ray Cross this week examined that question. There are the obvious answers, such as the economic impact the university has on our community, as well as the jobs it provides. But the university's connection to the community runs deeper than that. Many UWL graduates choose to live and work in La Crosse after college, contributing to our local economy. And the university does more than just teach students. Many conferences and symposiums are held at UWL, as well as the annual state track meet. These things wouldn't happen if UWL weren't here. Of course no one is suggesting we don't need the university. But we do need to make sure it is well supported. That hasn't been happening lately, with state imposed tuition freezes and state budget cuts hurting the bottom line. It is time to begin reinvesting in higher education in the state. As Rep. Jill Billings points out, every dollar spent on higher ed leads to a $10 return, and that is a good investment for Wisconsin taxpayers.

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Wednesday - November 30, 2016 10:21 am

Despite claims on both sides, election was not rigged

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Can we please stop claiming the election was rigged? We heard that claim from Donald Trump throughout the campaign. He refused to say whether he would abide by the results of the election. That prompted a flurry of criticism from democrats like U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin, who condemned candidate Trump from his comments. But now the shoe is on the other foot. Now some democrats are suggesting the election was rigged, that hackers somehow played a role in getting Trump elected. Baloney. But Baldwin isn't shouting from the rooftops now. With democrats forcing a recount of every presidential ballot cast in Wisconsin, she should be condemning this latest suggestion the election was rigged. But she has been silent, along with other democrats who condemned Trump. Trump isn't doing our democracy any favors either. He continues to offer his unsubstantiated claim that two million illegal aliens voted in our recent election, and that is the only reason he didn't win the popular vote. Enough already. That is disparaging to municipal clerks who work hard to ensure election integrity. The fact is Donald Trump earned enough votes in our current system of selecting presidents to win the job. Let's just accept that, and move on, and end this nonsense about rigged elections.

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