As I See It

As I See It (349)

Wisconsin's longest running daily commentary, a daily tradition since 1971.

Voters are frustrated this election season. Many potential voters are less than enthused about either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump as our next President. Polls show the two to be the most unpopular candidates ever to square off in a race for President. Voters astutely point out that it is frustrating that we have more choices in the yogurt aisle than we have in determining who will lead our country for the next four years. But we do have more choices, if we are willing to make them. In addition to the names Clinton and Trump on Tuesday's ballot, there are actually five other choices. These are candidates who most haven't heard of, but who filed the necessary paperwork to get on the ballot. Like Darrel Castle, the nominee of the Constitution Party, a group dedicated to advancing laws that are patterned after God's laws, as outlined in the Bible. Another choice is Jill Stein of the Green Party which promotes social, economic and environmental justice. Also on the ballot is Monica Moorhead of the Workers World Party, which seeks to abolish capitalism. Gary Johnson represents the Libertarian Party, and he will be a choice for President for local voters. And Rocky de la Fuente heads the American Delta Party, which is focused on exposing the corruption of our political system. So we may not have as many choices for President as we have for yogurt, but we do have more than two flavors to choose from. The question is, if you don't like the mainstream candidates, can you bring yourself to vote for some other name on the ballot?

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It is getting to be that time of year that even when the days are mild, there is a chill in the evening air. Many of us are barely inconvenienced by the brisk weather, able to simply turn up the heat a bit. But that is not the case for La Crosse's homeless population. That is why La Crosse is so fortunate to have people willing to help those who struggle in the cold weather. The Warming Center, operated by La Crosse's Catholic Charities, has now opened for the season to provide a place where those in need of shelter can gather when the winds blow cold. The shelter has been available for several years, but continues to grow. Formerly housed in a local church, where people would line up outside for several hours to secure a spot, the Warming Center can now accommodate more than 30 people, and offers a warm bed, hot shower, and laundry facilities. There is no charge for people to stay there, and unless they are causing trouble, no one is turned away, even if they suffer from mental health issues or addiction. Turns out they get just as cold as everyone else. These people are treated with dignity and respect as they are given a helping hand. La Crosse is fortunate to be blessed with the volunteers who operate this valuable program, to make sure that everyone makes it through another Wisconsin winter.

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Wednesday - November 2, 2016 8:58 am

Hard to cheat? Yes. Easy to vote? No.

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Another endorsement for the integrity of Wisconsin elections, but from an unlikely source. Governor Scott Walker, who has led efforts to restrict voting opportunities in the state, now says it will be easy to vote, but hard to cheat, in Wisconsin elections. It is good to hear the Governor rebuke the claims from the top of the ticket that elections in the U.S. are somehow rigged. He is right. People need not worry about the security of their votes. But to say it is easy to vote is rather hypocritical, given how many steps Walker and other Madison lawmakers have taken to actually try to make it harder to vote. The state has adopted a controversial Voter ID law, requiring many people to make a trip to the DMV before they can cast a ballot. And that hasn't gone all that smoothly, with a federal judge criticizing the state for making the process more confusing than need be. Walker and others worked to restrict early voting opportunities, which are proving increasingly popular, trimming the amount of time local clerks could allow ballots to be cast. They worked to do away with special deputies, which help people, often the infirmed, register to vote and cast a ballot. Our Governor is right that it is hard to cheat in Wisconsin elections, but he is all wet when he says it is easy to vote.

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Tuesday - November 1, 2016 9:53 am

American people the losers in this election

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The presidential election is now just one week from today. Who will win? The answer to that is still unclear. But we do know who will lose. The American people. Actually, we have already lost, no matter who wins next Tuesday. After the votes are tallied, about half of the country will be unhappy with the results. We are as polarized, politically, as a nation than we have ever been. But the woes run deeper. Our two choices for president are among the most unpopular ever at the top of the ticket. Many Republicans don't like Donald Trump and many Democrats don't like Hillary Clinton. Both political parties will likely come out of this race licking their wounds. The Republican party is splintered, and Hillary is still feeling the Bern from young voters. And whoever wins will enter the official office faced with trying to get their policies through our do-nothing Congress. They could again play the role of obstructionist, shooting down any legislation the new President offers, even if only to prop up their own political party. We will likely all be glad when this rather putrid campaign is over, but don't expect things to automatically get better after next Tuesday.

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Monday - October 31, 2016 10:47 am

Those who host may not lose the most

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Those who host lose the most. That is the message plastered on billboards throughout the La Crosse area, designed to remind parents they can get in trouble for hosting underage drinking parties at their home. But as a result of a court ruling in Wisconsin last week, those billboard may be coming down soon. A Fond du Lac parent successfully appealed the $1000 fine he was given for violating that county's social host ordinance. The court ruled that, among other things, the county's statue is more strict than the state law, and is therefore illegal. Many other communities, including La Crosse and Onalaska have similar ordiances on the books, but because of the court ruling are now likely unenforceable. That is a setback for those who have worked hard for years to curb underange drinking in our area, in part by fining parents who allow drinking in their home. It is now up to the state legislature to revisit that law, making sure that it is properly written and enforceable. And our lawmakers should get to work on that quickly, before the next round of graduation parties arrives.

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Tuesday - October 25, 2016 9:54 am

Let Wisconsin Ethics Commission do its job

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Perhaps you have seen the video which purportedly shows evidence of voter fraud in Wisconsin. In the video shot by the group Project Veritas Action, a democratic political operative in Madison is shown talking, in profane terms, of planning to incite violence at Donald Trump rallies. This is a significant allegation, and the democratic operative has already been fired. But more trouble may follow, as it is possible some laws were broken. But just who should be in charge of getting to the bottom of this? Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel would be the likely lead investigator, as he is the state's top law enforcement official. But is he the right person for the job? Schimel is after all a Republican who works to advance his party's agenda. The Wisconsin Justice Initiative says Schimel, given his partisanship, is the wrong person to investigate the conservative filmmaker's claims that the video shows evidence of voter fraud. They have a point. That is why Wisconsin's newly formed ethics commission should be in charge of the investigation. The board is comprised of both republicans and democrats, and has as its charge ensuring compliance with elections laws. This case certainly seems to fit that description. Let's keep partisanship out of the investigation, and allow this new commission to do the work it was created to do.

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Monday - October 24, 2016 9:03 am

Our elections are not rigged

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The election is rigged. That is the claim from one of our presidential candidates. It is not true, of course, but that isn't stopping some from believing it. The fact is, there is integrity to our elections. In Wisconsin, a number of steps are taken to ensure that the outcome of the elections is determined solely by the voters. Some of those steps are obvious. People must prove their identity when they register to vote, and must now show a photo ID at the polls. But much of the work is done behind the scenes. A statewide voter database updated in real time ensures people are only registered once, and aren't convicted felons prohibited from voting.The voting machines are tested, publicly, before each election. On election day, the results, tabulated by voting machines, are kept in a vault, a priority for local clerks throughout the state. And even after the votes are tallied, every local clerk in Wisconsin canvasses the vote, doublechecking to ensure all the numbers add up. If there are rare instances of some sort of fraud, typically accidents, those who somehow vote twice can be prosecuted by our courts. The United States election system is not rigged. To say that it is is an insult to those who work so hard to ensure the integrity of our elections. They deserve our thanks, not our criticism.

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Tuesday - October 18, 2016 8:58 am

Will final debate focus on real issues?

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It has come down to this. The final presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton happens tomorrow night. It marks the final chance for the two candidates to share a stage together, and the final chance for the two presidential hopefuls to tell us where they stand on the issues. Unfortunately, the first two debates were mired by finger-pointing and name calling, with very little discussion of actual policy. We have heard little on the candidate's stand on tax policy, or foreign policy or other issues they would be charged with dealing with as President. Instead we have heard discussions of sexual abuse, adultery and whether one of them should be in jail. The American people deserve better. One issue that should be the subject of debate is transparency. Neither candidate has offered their views of how transparent their administration should or would be. There are few issues as important to so many people. Transparency is key to our democracy, allowing citizens to hold our representatives accountable. But neither presidential candidate has even addressed the topic.They dodge it at every turn, from refusing to share emails or release their tax returns. In fact, we have found out more about how they really operate from the likes of Wikileaks and TMZ. We deserve to know whether they pledge to run an open government. But if past history is any guide, we won't even hear the topic discussed at the final presidential debate.

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Monday - October 17, 2016 10:21 am

No excuse for not voting

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The time to exercise your right has now begun. Starting today, early voting for the November 8 election begins in La Crosse County. That gives us three weeks to cast a ballot at our convenience. And it gives us little excuse for not bothering to cast a ballot. You don't need a reason to vote early, or by absentee. Any Wisconsin voter who wants to vote early at their local clerk's office, or by mail, has the right to do so. We have seen in recent elections the increased popularity of early voting. It makes it more convenient, especially if there is a chance we won't be able to make it to the polls on November 8th. But voting early to avoid long lines at the polls doesn't guarantee you won't still have to stand in line. It is not uncommon for people to have to line up to vote early. You will still have to show a photo ID when voting early. And if you choose to vote absentee, you will need to ensure the witness fills in their address, or it will be thrown out under a new state law. If you aren't sure where you vote, or have any questions about the election process, this is a good time to contact your local clerk, who will be happy to help. So if it is more convenient for you, feel free to vote today. It is your right, and it should be exercised.

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Friday - October 14, 2016 9:03 am

La Crosse should budget only for what city needs

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The city of La Crosse has done a good job holding the line on property taxes in recent years. The levy rate has held basically steady for several years, meaning that for most people their property taxes have not gone up. In fact, the city's share of property taxes has held steady for five years. Again this year, Mayor Tim Kabat put forth a budget which would continue to fund essential city services, and do so without raising taxes. That is what we should want in a budget. But others think the city should spend more, even when it doesn't need to spend more. That was the vote of the La Crosse Board of Estimates which voted to add $250,000 in spending, for no reason. Just to have it in case they need it. Some wanted to add nearly twice that much in spending. And tuck it away in reserves. Because we might need it some day. The Mayor's budget does what a budget is supposed to do. Identify spending priorities, and fund those which are most important to the community. Not spend, or tuck away, or more importantly, take from us, what they don't need.

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